Lost the Plot – Episode 14

Also available via iTunes:
https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/lost-the-plot-podacast/id1185190716

Seeking Tumnus YA Fiction Podcast
seekingtumnus.com/

World Builders
worldbuilders.org/page/fundraising
Michelle West books

Lost Rocks
Lost Rocks

The Great Book Swap – Indigenous Literacy Foundation
www.greatbookswap.org.au/

My New Bookshelf 😀
Book Shelf

Blemish Books – Pulpture
blemishbooks.com.au/news/index.shtml
blemishbooks.com.au/pulpture/index.…tform=hootsuite
WIP Pulpture

Banjo Paterson Park
Banjo Paterson Park

Banjo Paterson Bricks

Treasures from my Bookish Past

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Does anyone want these? Comment somewhere and I will send them.

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30 books!! I’m not making this up – people would have been sponsoring me like 20c a book.

 

 

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Hugo Award Finalists
www.worldcon.fi/wsfs/hugo-finalists/

Sad Puppies
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sad_Puppies

Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award
www.theguardian.com/books/2017/apr/…d-wolf-erlbruch

Banned Books Week – 2016 Top Challenged Books
www.facebook.com/bannedbooksweek/…f=PAGES_TIMELINE

2016 Top Challenged Books
www.bustle.com/p/the-most-challe…leanor-park-50160

Aranda Primary School Decommissions Library
www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/ara…-gvtcpx.html

National Simultaneous Storytime
www.alia.org.au/nss#resources

Anita Heiss’ New Book
www.facebook.com/AnitaHeissAuthor…/?type=3&theater

Cleverman Graphic Novel
www.facebook.com/ClevermanTV/phot…/?type=3&theater

Tara Moss Working on New Book
www.facebook.com/taramossauthor/p…/?type=3&theater

Free Copies of the Handmaid’s Tale in NYC
www.huffingtonpost.com.au/entry/free-c…af6d718a3ee6

My Cousin Rachel
www.facebook.com/ViragoPress/vide…f=PAGES_TIMELINE

Berlin Syndrome
www.facebook.com/BerlinSyndromeAU…f=PAGES_TIMELINE

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Casting
www.facebook.com/pottermore/photo…/?type=3&theater
www.buzzfeed.com/eleanorbate/the-…books#.otw8edGB3

The Wheel of Time TV Series
variety.com/2017/tv/news/wheel-…tv-series-sony-1202

Kim Morton
feminartsy.com/unspoken-the-real…btqi-communities/

Apply to be a CBCA Judge
cbca.org.au/judges-judging

What’s In a Name by Myles Walsh
trove.nla.gov.au/work/213497657?s…sion=NBD58638784

Mrs Whitlam by Bruce Pascoe
www.goodreads.com/book/show/303422…from_search=true

Dragonfly Song by Wendy Orr
www.goodreads.com/book/show/298660…from_search=true

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Big Little Lies

This book is generating a bit of attention lately because of the TV adaptation that was released earlier this year starring Nicole Kidman, Reese Witherspoon and Alexander SkarsgÃ¥rd. Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to watch the series (but I’ll keep my thoughts on Foxtel to myself), so I thought I’d give the book a go and see what the hype is about.

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“Big Little Lies” by Liane Moriarty is a novel set in a small coastal community in Australia. The story follows single mother Jane who has just moved to Pirriwee Peninsular and has enrolled her little boy Ziggy into kindergarten. Although she forms a friendship with fiery Madeline and beautiful Celeste, two other mums with kids in Ziggy’s class, an incident on orientation day sets her offside with another parent. Meanwhile, Madeline grapples with a teenage daughter who is spending more time with her ex-husband and his new wife, and Celeste struggles to make sense of the brittle veneer of her seemingly perfect life.

I was surprised by this book. I think I have a lot of automatic prejudice against chick-lit or books that seem a bit mumsy. This book in particular has a strong focus on the interpersonal relationships between the kindergarten mums (and dad) at Pirawee Public and I was expecting it to be a bit…well…suburban. What I found was a book of significant depth with a wry and sometimes irreverent tone that tackled some heavy issues such as domestic violence and sexual assault. Moriarty has a real talent when it comes to her characters, and in particular I enjoyed the humerous interjections at the beginning and ending of chapters of various characters giving their amusing (and often contradictory) opinions about events as they unfolded.

I think probably the only think that frustrated me about this book was that the characters, while interesting and engaging, weren’t particularly diverse. Without mentioning any spoilers, there was a particular reveal about a character late in the book that I thought wasn’t very well done and which marred the story somewhat.

Nevertheless, this is a fun read that balances flippant jokes against serious insights. I was pleasantly surprised and I think it will do a lot to break down the stigma of domestic violence.

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Filed under Australian Books, Book Reviews, General Fiction

High Summons and Grimm Remains

I received a copy of these two eBooks courtesy of the author.

High Summons     Grim Remains

“High Summons” and “Grimm Remains” are the first two books in the “Warlock of Rochester” series by Eli Celata. Urban fantasy set in the author’s own university town, the series is about a young biracial man called Jon who can secretly wield magic. He moves to a new city called Rochester for university and finds himself under the unlikely tutelage of the mysterious and taciturn Jordan. Desperate to find out more about the father he never knew, Jon steps into the world of magic and discovers that it comes with a price.

A modern take on the classic angels and demons story, this book is a love letter to the author’s own stomping ground on the USA/Canadian border. Jon is an interesting character with straddles two worlds not only because of his race, but also because of his magical status. “High Summons” was a little slow to warm up, but “Grimm Remains” was a quicker read with more diverse characters and more revealed about Jon’s family.

A fun interpretation of Constantine/biblical demon mythology best suited to those who love fantasy in modern settings.

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Filed under Book Reviews, eBooks, Fantasy

The Natural Way of Things

This book was already on my radar before it won the Stella Prize. It really got on my radar when I saw the author speak at the National Library in March. I was so stoked to hear what she had to say and get my book signed.

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“The Natural Way of Things” by Charlotte Wood is a book that I’m a bit reluctant to give too much background to. Two women wake up to find themselves drugged and in an unknown place. As the drugs wear off, they begin to understand the severity of their situation. Humiliated, degraded and isolated by an unlikely pair of guards, they realise that they are one of a group of ten women. As time goes on, what it is that links the women together begins to come clear and the power the guards wield over them begins to grow more tenuous.

First things first, this is the best book I’ve read so far this year. It is utterly compelling, unbelievably disturbing and uncomfortable in how close it hits to home. Wood is an extremely tactile writer and captures the full range of human experiences both physical and emotional. Although the location is fictional, the detail is so vivid and so…Australian that imagining it is effortless. Again, I don’t really want to give too much away about this book because I really believe it is an experience that you should simply let wash over you. Nevertheless, I do want to say some things about the characters. It was pretty appalling to me how familiar the characters of Teddy and Boncer were when I was reading about them. How people who consider themselves to be so unique end up being the worst kind of followers.

Reading this book, it’s impossible not to imagine yourself in the shoes of these women and wonder how you yourself would react in such a situation. I think the only criticism I could possibly have about this book is that Wood really demands a lot from her readers. She is deliberately vague about a lot of the details of the story, the “before” and “after” of the narrative. Although I think it’s largely a good thing (I think a lot of modern books suffer from bad cases of “tell” instead of “show), there are points where the lack of information can border on the frustrating.

Anyway, this is a phenomenal, visceral book that is confronting as it is engrossing. I read it a few weeks ago but I still find myself flashing back to it and thinking about it. I would highly recommend this book, and it winning the Stella Prize was no accident.

 

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Filed under Australian Books, Book Reviews, General Fiction

Saga Volume 7

I’ve been following this graphic novel series (by Brian K. Vaughn and illustrated by Fiona Staples) for a while, so if you want to see what I’ve written about earlier volumes you can check them out here, here and here.

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In my last review, I said that I liked Volume 6 a bit less than the other volumes. I’m very sad to say that I think despite starting out all guns blazing, Saga is on a downward trend. If you’re going to kill off main characters, you need to replace them with something of equal or greater value. Unfortunately, I’m just not loving the replacements. It’s such an action-intensive series that, especially with these volumes only coming out every 9 months or so, it’s a bit hard to keep tabs on everything that’s going on. I think maybe it’s also crossed the line from being wild and irreverent to actually quite maudlin.

Anyway, look, I’ll probably keep reading these, but I’ve definitely lost a bit of my enthusiasm after the last couple of volumes. It’s still hard-hitting, but maybe not as fun.

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Filed under Book Reviews, Graphic Novels, Uncategorized

Lost the Plot – Episode 13

Slight language warning. Also available via iTunes:
https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/lost-the-plot-podacast/id1185190716

Book Crossing
www.bookcrossing.com/

Copyright Improvement for Disability
theconversation.com/australias-copy…the-blind-67709

www.psnews.com.au/aps/543/news/lib…opyright-changes

Man Returns Library Book 35 Years Overdue
www.atlasobscura.com/articles/man-r…ium=atlas-page

The Great Book Swap

https://indigenousliteracyfoundation.secure.force.com/CICD__CAFSignUp?id=701A0000001BA4d

Indigenous Poet Wins $215,000 Literary Prize
www.theguardian.com/books/2017/mar/…MP=share_btn_tw

The Stella Prize
thestellaprize.com.au/prize/2017/

The International Man Booker Prize Longlist
themanbookerprize.com/news/man-booke…list-announced

ABIA Awards Longlist
abiawards.com.au/general/2017-abia-book-longlist/

Children’s Book Council of Australia Awards Shortlist
cbca.org.au/short-list-2017

Headmaster Bans Books from School Library
www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/h…brary-1.3028857

Steve Biddulph Asked to Sign Gag Before Talk
www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-02/p…cceptable/8318670

Author Asked Not To Talk About Own Book
nerdybookclub.wordpress.com/2017/03/23/…arbara-dee/

Backlash for Comments about Trans Women
www.huffingtonpost.com.au/entry/chimam…d1078ca7180b

Jackie French’s Wombat Chews Book
http://www.facebook.com/authorjackiefren…f=PAGES_TIMELINE

Melania Trump Reads to Sick Kids
http://www.facebook.com/bbcnews/videos/1…f=PAGES_TIMELINE

Underappreciated Labour of the Wives of Fiction Authors
www.buzzfeed.com/ishmaeldaro/than…RQg0r#.ynj2gjm8P

Science Fiction Let Down by Aussie Publilshers
www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-09/a…ublishers/8336308

Libraries ACT Book Sale
www.facebook.com/LibrariesACT/pho…/?type=3&theater

Lyneham Secondhand Bookstore Robbed Twice
www.facebook.com/booklorelyneham/…1248589508572596

www.facebook.com/booklorelyneham/…/?type=3&theater

www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/own…-gv901h.html

Cartoonist Murray Ball Dies
www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-12/m…anic&sf61819830=1

Harry Potter 20th Anniversary Exhibition
www.facebook.com/britishlibrary/p…/?type=3&theater

Cover Revealed for 3rd Stormlight Archive Book
www.tor.com/2017/03/16/revealin…stormlight-archive/

New le Carre Book
penguin.com.au/authors/85-john-l…new-john-le-carre

Stephen Fry Narrates Sherlock Holmes
www.facebook.com/bbcnews/videos/1…f=PAGES_TIMELINE

Film Adaptation of My Cousin Rachel
www.facebook.com/ViragoPress/phot…/?type=3&theater

Books for the World
www.books4theworld.com

Books Arrive in Tanzania

Books for the World - Tanzania

Sekolah Gunung Merapi

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Filed under Books for the World, Lost the Plot

A Thousand Splendid Suns

I’ve been saving this book. I absolutely adored the author’s first novel, the incredible book “The Kite Runner”, and I was really looking forward to reading his equally as acclaimed second novel.

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“A Thousand Splendid Suns” by Khaled Hosseini is a novel that spans several decades and the lives of two women in Afghanistan. The illegitimate daughter of a wealthy man with three wives and many other children, Mariam grows up in a secluded hut with her mother. Although she relishes her father’s weekly visits, she longs for more than her mother’s pessimism and when she is 15, she risks everything and ventures alone into town to confront him. Years later, Laila, another 15 year old, is living in another city but it might as well be another world. Raised in a loving family, although somewhat in the shadow of her absent older brothers, Laila is taught that she can be whoever she wants. However after disaster strikes again and again, Laila finds herself in a desperate situation – one very similar to that of Mariam.

I wanted to like this book. I wanted to like it so much. I was absolutely blown away when I read “The Kite Runner”, by its creativity as well as its expression, but this book just didn’t do it for me. Part of it was the writing. For some reason, in this book I really felt that Hosseini did a lot of telling, but didn’t do much showing. A lot of the plot felt as heavy-handed as Mariam’s husband. You could see the blows coming a mile away. Story-wise, this book actually reminded me a lot of “The Colour Purple” by Alice Walker. The abusive husband, the lies, the family sent away, the unlikely but enduring female friendship. I felt like Walker’s novel was written much more from the heart. You really feel for Celie in a way that I just couldn’t feel for either Mariam or Leila. Mariam the martyr and Leila the angel. One thing that really bothered me (and which bothers me about a lot of fiction) was Hosseini’s treatment of virginity. He just seemed overly fixated on the seemingly inevitable pain and blood involved in a woman’s first time having intercourse – regardless of the context. Hosseini just didn’t really seem to do a convincing job getting inside the heads of his two female main characters.

There were two things that I did like about this book. The first was that it gave me a bit more understanding about the relentlessness of the conflict in Afghanistan. I did admire Hosseini’s goal of trying to share insights with the reader into the impact of war on ordinary life. The second thing was that where Hosseini’s female characters were a bit two-dimensional, the main antagonist, Mariam’s husband Rasheed, was a brilliant example of the mercurial, complex and often inescapable nature of domestic violence.

I was expecting a brilliant book and I got an OK book. Readable without being groundbreaking, descriptive without being immersive, this book simply doesn’t hold a candle to “The Kite Runner”.

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Filed under Book Reviews, General Fiction