Category Archives: Science Fiction

The Brief and Frightening Reign of Phil

This book has been sitting on my to-read pile since my dad lent it to me at New Year’s. I thought the first eponymous story was just one of several short stories but it actually is more like a novella with several shortish stories afterwards. I toyed with the idea of just reading the first one, but the completionist in me won and I finished the book.

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“The Brief and Frightening Reign of Phil” by George Saunders is a novella about a micro and fictional country called Inner Horner which is only big enough to hold one citizen at a time. The remaining six citizens wait their turn in the short term residency zone of the surrounding country of Outer Horner. One day, with no warning, Inner Horner shrinks and only 1/4 of the current citizen in residence is now able to fit. Opportunistic Outer Hornerite Phil declares this event an invasion and disaster for the Inner Hornerites ensues. Tacked onto the end of this novella is “In Persuasion Nation” which is a collection of short stories mostly centred around themes of advertising and television.

The novella is a really interesting story that walks a fine line between satire and surrealism. Saunders takes an issue of incredible complexity (border control), and simplifies it down into its most basic and wacky elements. This story could really apply to any place or any time (and I can think of a few places right now) where internal pressures outside their control force people to leave their country and some unlikely megalomaniac uses that as as springboard to ascend to power. Saunders is a very imaginative writer with a keen eye for the ridiculous. The rest of the short stories were a bit more of a mixed bag. I really enjoyed some of them, especially “my flamboyant grandson”, but some of the others were a bit too abstract or a bit too blunt in their messaging.

“The Brief and Frightening Reign of Phil” is a timeless reminder that success shouldn’t be achieved by taking advantage of someone else’s misfortune. Even though this story was first published in 2005, it would have applied just as easily in 1945 as it does today.

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Filed under Book Reviews, Science Fiction, Short Stories

The Heart Goes Last

Margaret Atwood is one of my favourite authors, so when she released a new novel 18 months ago I was pretty excited to read it. I bought a copy but somehow it got lost in my to-read pile and she’s since released another book. Finally it made it to the front of the rotation, and I was eager to see if I’d like it as much as I liked books like “The Blind Assassin” or “Cat’s Eye”.

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“The Heart Goes Last” by Margaret Atwood is a dystopian science fiction novel set in a not-too distant future. Married couple Charmaine and Stan are living in their car after losing their home in a financial crash. Unable to get a job where his tech skills apply, Stan’s self esteem is ebbing while Charmaine works for peanuts at a bar to support them. When Charmaine sees an advertisement for a social experiment that claims to eradicate poverty, Charmaine convinces a reluctant Stan that this is the answer to their problems. Despite his reservations, Stan agrees to sign his life away to a utopian promise where in exchange for one month of paradise, participants spend one month in prison.

I just didn’t feel this book. I wanted to like it, but I could not get myself immersed. Stan and Charmaine just feel like the archetypes of the middle-class, straight white heterosexual couple. They start out unremarkable and they stay unremarkable. The premise is interesting, but Consilience as a concept felt a bit unfinished and under-researched and as a consequence lacked credibility. Maybe this is because the setting is too close to now, and it’s easier to suspend disbelief when the society described is far from our own. The characters on the inside all have a bit of a cardboard cut out feel and as Stan embarks on his mission, it’s just scene after scene of characters that don’t appear to have any distinct personality from one another. I felt like the gender segregation part of the book was a missed opportunity, and way too much of the book was dominated by sex and fetishes that were largely disconnected from the main plot. In even the most highly emotional parts of the book, I didn’t feel moved. Even if this is meant to be satire and a critique of where our society is heading, the story just feels way too artificial and ultimately falls flat.

Although Margaret Atwood has succeeded in writing dystopian fiction in the past, I think this book misses the mark.

 

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Bender

I received a copy of this book courtesy of the author. I was immediately intrigued by the premise – four love stories that cross through time and space.

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“Bender” by Alexander Rigby is a historical fiction/science fiction hybrid novel about four star-crossed couples whose love is forbidden. During ancient Egyptian times, a pharaoh’s daughter falls for a slave. In Renaissance Italy where homosexuality is punishable by death, two men fall in love. In 1980s USA, two people meet who are already taken. Then, in an Argentina set 200 years from now, two women find themselves in an impossible situation.

Rigby is an elegant writer who fills his pages with rich imagery. This is a well-paced story that keeps you turning your pages to find out the fates of each of the four couples. Rigby’s concept is refreshingly original and thought-provoking. I found myself pondering the meaning of life, love and souls more than once throughout this book. The only thing I found a bit challenging about this book were that some of the stories, namely the ancient Egyptian and futuristic Argentinian stories, hooked me more than others.

A great book for anyone who is into romance, historical fiction or light science fiction.

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The Fifth Season

This book was the Hugo Award winner for best science fiction/fantasy novel this year and was the set book in one of my book clubs. I’ve been trying to read more diversely this year and I have to say, I don’t think I have read any fantasy or science fiction by an African American writer before. This is hardly a surprise: N. K. Jemisin is the first black writer to win the Hugo Award for best novel.

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“The Fifth Season” by N. K. Jemisin is the first book in “The Broken Earth Trilogy”. Set in a land beset with tectonic activity, and ironically called the Stillness, the world is ending. For Essun, the unthinkable has happened: her idyllic family life is shattered and all she can think about now is revenge. For Damaya, her family have given her up to the Fulcrum for who she is: a rogga, an orogene. Someone who can calm the shaking Earth and who must be controlled. For Syenite, it might just be her fault the world ends – whether she wants it to or not.

The thing that stands out about this book is its sheer originality. I’ve read a lot of fantasy books and I have never read a fantasy book like this one. It’s dark, it’s gritty and it’s catastrophic. Boundaries are pushed in every direction. The “magic”, the power to manipulate stone and fault lines, is just so unique I was blown away. The culture of the comms is fascinating and the sheer diversity of the characters is incredible. It’s not really a surprise that this won the Hugo Award. I think there was only one thing that got under my skin about this book and that was that some of the imagery got a little repetitive. It’s a small thing that I’m willing to forgive though for this epic book.

If you’re bored out of your mind with elves and orcs, pick this book up and read it immediately. It’s a deep, evocative read that demands you take your time, and it will linger like aftershocks after you’ve finished it.

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Haze

Some of you might already know that in addition to this blog, Tinted Edges also has a Facebook page and a Tumblr page. Not too long ago I got a PM via the Tinted Edges Tumblr page asking me to review an e-book. Of course I said yes.

“Haze” by Brandon J. Barnard is a dystopian novella set in the UK in the 2070s – a dark place where air outside is poison. Jack Decker is a PA in a London company who is as awkward as he is unsatisfied in his work. He spends his spare time reading and Digital Diving, escaping into perfect virtual worlds. One day he meets a new girl at his work called Haze and all of a sudden his grey world is painted technicolour. Caught up in his new romance, the last thing Jack wants to do is think about his past but it starts to catch up with him anyway.

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This book was quite a surprise. Barnard has a rather lyrical and humorous way of writing and the subject matter was subtle and nuanced. Although there were a few clever technological concepts throughout “Haze”, I think this book would have almost worked just as well in current times. The themes explored by Barnard are extremely topical to today’s society. My only criticism is that “Haze” gets off to a rather slow start and it’s not until about halfway through the book that Barnard starts to really hit his stride.

A strong debut by a self-published author, “Haze” was an unexpected and enjoyable read and I look forward to seeing what Barnard comes up with next.

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Saga Volume 6

It was the end of a long day at work a couple of weeks ago and my partner had sent me a message saying that pick me up at the carpark. I rode the elevator down and crossed the street, looking forward to being out of the cold and into some comfy clothes. I walked through the carpark until I saw our car, opened the door, and lo and behold! A brand new copy of “Saga Volume 6” was waiting for me right in the passenger seat!

If you’ve been following this blog for a while, you might have picked up my obsession with the “Saga” series. Written by Brian K. Vaughan and illustrated by Fiona Staples, the sixth installment dives right back into the action a couple of years after the last one ended.

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I think maybe I enjoyed this one ever so slightly less than the first five, and I think that’s partially because some of my favourite characters didn’t make an appearance.

Anyway, there is still plenty of gratuitous sex, nudity, violence and drug use, the premise is still ludicrous and if you aren’t completely offended by it, it’s still a rip-roaring read.

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Shades of Grey

Not too long ago, I went to see Jasper Fforde speak at the Australian National University. He was kind enough to sign my battered copy of his book “The Eyre Affair”, and it was great hearing him speak. I was telling a friend of mine about this and she highly recommended another book of his called “Shades of Grey” (not to be mistaken for the infamous BDSM-lite novel “Fifty Shades of Grey”). I was browsing my local Dymocks store recently and Fforde’s name caught my eye with a little tag underneath his book that said ‘signed copy’. I couldn’t NOT buy it.

“Shades of Grey” is set in a dystopian future England where people can no longer see all the colours in the visible light spectrum. Society has been stratified based on what colours you can see, with purple being at the top and red being at the bottom. People who cannot see any colour at all are the Greys, and they are more or less used as slave labour. The main character is a Red called Eddie Russett who has been sent to a backwaters town called East Carmine to conduct a chair census while his dad works as the new swatchman (i.e. doctor). Eddie suspects that he had ruffled a few feathers after playing a prank and concentrates on getting himself back home to his wealthy, semi-betrothed sweetheart. However after he meets the mysterious and extremely volatile Grey called Jane, Eddie’s priorities take a dramatic shift.

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This book was an absolute breath of fresh air. Sometimes when I’m reading, I get a little bogged down in the idea that everything has been done before and nothing is a new idea. If you ever get stuck in that kind of mindset, drop everything and read this book. It is so original and wild and clever, and I’ve said it before, but Jasper Fforde is pretty much a comedian who writes his jokes rather than saying them. The concept of this book is so unique and the execution is almost flawless. The world of Chromatacia is hilarious, arbitrary and disturbingly still a lot like our own.

There’s nothing much else to say about this book except that if you like fantasy or mystery or science fiction or dry British humour, then you’ll get a kick out of this. Jasper Fforde’s novels defy classification, and this is a book that I think most people would get something from.

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Filed under Book Reviews, Fantasy, General Fiction, Mystery/Thriller, Science Fiction, Signed Books